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Regional Highlights
Regional Highlights
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Cradle Mountain

Region: Central Hinterland

Cradle Mountain is a destination many visitors to Tasmania have high on their list. Australia's most recognisable mountain, Cradle Mountain forms the north-western end of Tasmania's Central Highlands. Along with neighbouring Lake St Clair National Park, it is a part of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area.

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The Tarkine

The Tarkine

Region: North West Hinterland

The Tarkine region of North West Tasmania is a very special part of the state, as it contains extensive high-quality wilderness as well as extensive, largely undisturbed tracts of cool temperate rainforest which are extremely rare. It also represents Australia's largest remaining single tract of temperate rainforest. What makes it extra-special is that it can be easily accessed with just a 2 wheel drive vehicle.

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Gt Western TiersThe Tarkine

Gt Western Tiers

Region: Central Hinterland

The Great Western Tiers are a collection of World Heritage listed mountain bluffs that form the northern edge of the Central Highlands plateau in Tasmania. Here you will find waterfalls, canyons and spectacular mountain vistas.

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Table Cape

Table Cape

Region: North West Coast

Table Cape - a circular volcanic plug with a flat top - makes an impressive and dramatic backdrop across Bass Strait for the town of Wynyard. Table Cape's top and surrounding areas are composed of fertile basalt soils and are heavily cultivated, the area is renowned for the annual flowering of tulips during spring and accompanying tulip festival.

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Leven Canyon

Leven Canyon

Region: North West Hinterland

Leven Canyon is a 250 metre deep ravine that is part of a wildlife corridor from the coast to Cradle Mountain. The Leven River runs through 300-metre limestone cliffs carved through the Loongana Range, down to Bass Strait. The canyon is a little-known tourist destination, however the viewing platform offers spectacular views of Black Bluff, the canyon itself and the surrounding areas. A walking track gives access to the canyon floor.

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Circular Head

Circular Head

Region: North West Coast

The town of Stanley lies sheltered beneath Circular Head, known as The Nut, a volcanic plug which forms a massive headland projecting from the surrounding low relief coastal topography. Matthew Flinders and George Bass sighted the nut, given it the name 'Circular Head', in 1798 during their historic circumnavigation of Tasmania, then known as Van Diemen's Land. Visitors to the Nut can either walk via a path or take the Nut Chairlift ride to the summit for a unique view of Stanley and surrounding areas. There is a 30 minute walk around the summit with lookouts and interpretation signs along the way.

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Regional Centres

West Coast

2 to 3 hours drive from Devonport or Burnie, Tasmania's West Coast region is made up of serene natural harbours, rugged coast, densely forested mountain ranges, fast flowing rivers, steep gorges, rainforest wilderness and ghost towns. The region has some of the most pristine and beautiful wilderness in the world, encapsulated in the World Heritage listed Franklin-Gordon Wild Rivers National Park. Bushwalkers are rewarded by spectacular nature sights. Even the less energetic can enjoy the untouched rainforests while cruising the Gordon and Pieman Rivers.

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Regional Centres
Regional Centres
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Burnie
Regional Centres
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Region: North West Coast

Situated on Emu Bay at the mouth of the Emu River, Burnie is Tasmania's third largest city and port for the rich agricultural and mineral mining activities of the region. Burnie is a major deepwater port for the north of Tasmania, with two permanent container ships making daily crossings to Melbourne. Burnie's location - midway along the Bass Strait coast of Tasmania's worth west - makes it an ideal base from which to explore the north west region of the state. It has a wide range of accommodation and a big business and shopping precinct, to ensure every need for the traveller is catered for.

See and Do

All About Burnie

Burnie On A Plate

Neighbouring Towns: Somerset

Somerset

Somerset

Somerset is located on the estuary of the western bank of the Cam River midway between the township of Wynyard and the city of Burnie. At one time it was a town in its own right but is now practically a satellite suburb of the city of Burnie. In 1856 the settlement was named in honour of the Earl of Somerset. In earlier times it was also known as ‘Port Maldon’ and ‘The Cam’, with the latter name being used well into the 20th century.

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Devonport
Regional Centres
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Region: Central Coast

Devonport, at the mouth of the Mersey River, is one of three major cities in Tasmania's north, the others being Launceston and Burnie. To visitors to Tasmania, it is primarily known as the port for the Spirit of Tasmania car and passenger ferries - Spirit of Tasmania I and II - which make daily 10-hour trips between their terminals at East Devonport and Station Pier, Melbourne. Devonport is seen by many as a way station to other places, but there is plenty in the Devonport region for visitors to see and do in and around Devonport.

See and Do

All About Devonport

Burnie On A Plate

Neighbouring Towns: Devonport

Neighbouring Towns: Port Sorell

Port Sorell

Region: Central Coast

Port Sorell is a pretty coastal town featuring sheltered beaches, good fishing, orange lichen-covered rocks and foreshore reserves for camping and picnics. Nearby is Narawntapu National Park.

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Neighbouring Towns: Latrobe

Latrobe

Region: North West Coast

An historic farming centre on the Mersey River that was once an inland port serviced by ferries from Devonport. The town is just off the highway on the way to Launceston after leaving Devonport.

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Neighbouring Towns: Don

Don

Many of today's travellers through the small township of Don would find it difficult to believe that it was once a thriving pioneer settlement with a history that predates its neighbour, Devonport.

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Neighbouring Towns: Spreyton

Spreyton

Spreyton, located 5 km south of the City of devonport, is a small town that is today considered to be a suburb of Devonport. Spreyton is home to the fourth-generation family-run business Spreyton Fresh. Spreyton Fresh have had apple orchards in Spreyton since 1908 and in 1997 due to the downturn in juice apple prices have been producing a premium fresh apple juice.

Spreyton is named afer a small rural village just north of Dartmoor in Devon, England, famous for its connection to the tale of “Old Uncle Tom Cobley and all” who came from, and is thought to be buried in Spreyton. Spreyton's name and its connection with Devon, England, influenced the naming of Devon County, the early colonial name for the region between Devonport and Burnie. Devonport's name originates from it being the main port for Devon County.



Ulverstone
Regional Centres
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Region: Central Coast

Ulverstone is a substantial regional centre in a centralised location between the north-west coast's two cities, Burnie and Devonport. Ulverstone is 21 km west of Devonport and 28 km east of Burnie, 117 km from Launceston.

See and Do

All About Ulverstone

Burnie On A Plate

See and Do

Neighbouring Towns: Turners Beach/Forth

Turners Beach/Forth

Turners Beach and Leith are two localities on the shores of Bass Strait that are blessed with superb beaches, serene pieces of beach paradise that are untouched by the masses.

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Penguin
Regional Centres
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17 km south east of Burnie via Bass Highway and Preservation Drive

The little town of Penguin sits midway between Burnie and Ulverstone on Tasmania's Bass Strait coast. It's one of those pretty places that you can keep coming back to time and time again and never get tired of.

See and Do

Penguin On A Plate




Wynyard
Regional Centres
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Region: North West Coast

19 km north west of Burnie via Bass Highway

A pleasant rural town of around 5,000 people, Wynyard is a major regional hub, servicing many of the surrounding rural districts. It makes a good place to start exploration of the north west of Tasmania. The area is excellent for fishing. The Inglis and Flowerdale rivers are ideal for trout fishing and there is good ocean fishing as well.

See and Do

On A Plate
See and Do

Neighbouring Towns: Burnie

Boat Harbour Beach/Sisters Beach

33.5 km north west of Burnie via Bass Highway

This may well be the most beautiful village and beach on the whole north coast of Tasmania. It tumbles down the side of a gentle hill to a superb white beach with rocky headlands on either side.

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Stanley
Regional Centres
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Region: North West Coast

Sheltering on the leeward side of Circular Head, the village of Stanley is a picturesque dsettlement that seems to belong in a previous era, but has somehow managed to defy the march of time.

See and Do




Smithton
Regional Centres
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Region: North West Coast

In contrast to Stanley, its sleepy neighbour, Smithton is a busy little place, being the regional centre of one of Tasmania's most productive fishing, beef, dairying and potato growing areas. It is home to timber mills, the state s largest dairy produce factory, Duck River oysters. Don't be put off by some of the names in the area - like Cape Grim and Dismal Swamp. There is nothing grim or dismal about the extreme north west corner of Tasmania, which can be explored with ease from Smithton.

See and Do

All About Smithton




Neighbouring Towns: Marrawah

Marrawah

Tasmania's westernmost community and the furthest settlement from Hobart, Marrawah is the most popular surfing spot in Tasmania's north. The small town services the surrounding rich dairy farming area.

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Neighbouring Towns: Arthur River

Arthur River

Situated at the mouth of the Arthur River, this tiny settlement is an ideal base for walking, horse riding, fishing, off road driving, cruising the river and picnics in this remote, beautiful area.

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Neighbouring Towns: Arthur River

Mawbanna

A small rural settlement in Tasmania's North West, the locality was the site of the last recorded kill of a thylacine (Tasmanian Tiger) on 6th May 1930.

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Sheffield
Regional Centres
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Region: Central Coast Hinterland

A rural inland town 29 km south of Devonport set against the backdrop of Mt Roland, Sheffield is known as the Town of Murals because of the many murals that decorate the walls of buildings around the town. Names like Promised Land, Paradise and No Where Else were used to encapsulate the beauty of the region. Visitors today believe this still rings true! View rich agricultural fields, rolling green hills and natural vistas when journeying to Sheffield, Cradle Mountain, Wilmot and Railton.

See and Do

All About Sheffield

See and Do

Railton

Railton

The main attraction in this rural inland town is topiary, which is the art of shaping bushes and trees by careful pruning to resemble familiar objects such as animals. The town is 12 km from Sheffield.

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Promised Land

Promised Land

Far more than just a quirky name, this very picturesque rural locality is a rich farming area bounded by Lake Barrington on one side and the dramatic peaks of the Great Western Tiers on the other.

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Wilmot

Wilmot

Wilmot is sleepy little village in the foothills of the Great Western Tiers, that benefits from far more passing trade than they used to. Around the turn of the 20th century it became the birthplace of the Coles retail empire.

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Neighbouring Towns: Deloraine

Mole Creek

Mole Creek is a pretty town surrounded by some of Tasmania's most beautiful wilderness and is the perfect base for exploring nearby national parks, and its extensive, amazing caves.

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Neighbouring Towns: Deloraine

Chudleigh

The village of Chudleigh, not far from Mole Creek, is one of those places that seemed destined for greatness but never quite got there. It's well worth the stopover on your way to Mole Creek or even if you just passing through.

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Deloraine
Regional Centres
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Region: Meander Valley

Situated 53 km south east of Devonport and 51 km west of Launceston on Bass Highway, Deloraine is a delightful village in the valley of the Meander River. Deloraine has many heritage buildings, both in its main street and surrounding areas. The town's resident population of around 2,000 swells by 30,000 when Australia's biggest working craft fair comes to town every November. Held over four days, more than 200 exhibitors show everything from kites to candle wicks, kaleidoscopes to fine silkscreen paintings, woodcarvings, lead lights and hand-blown glassware.

See and Do

All About Deloraine

See and Do

Neighbouring Towns: Deloraine

Mole Creek

Mole Creek is a pretty town surrounded by some of Tasmania's most beautiful wilderness and is the perfect base for exploring nearby national parks, and its extensive, amazing caves.

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Neighbouring Towns: Deloraine

Chudleigh

The village of Chudleigh, not far from Mole Creek, is one of those places that seemed destined for greatness but never quite got there. It's well worth the stopover on your way to Mole Creek.

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Neighbouring Towns: Deloraine

Westbury

Often described by visitors as a hidden treasure, somewhere that they have stumbled across, Westbury is a pretty English-style Georgian village on the Great Western Tiers tourist Route between Devonport and Launceston. A village green, lots of tree-lined streets, old courtyards and stables, elegant old inns and a feast of charming old buildings means a visitor could easily spend a day just wandering around the streets.

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Neighbouring Towns: Deloraine

Elizabeth Town

Blink and you might miss it, but this is the place to try some of the best gourmet produce of Tasmania's north-west, it being at the heart of a productive agricultural region producing dairy products and small fruits.

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Waratah
Regional Centres
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Region: The Tarkine

Deep in the heart of Tasmania's Tarkine region, the town of Waratah was constructed to support a tin mine at Mount Bischoff. The town is built at the top of a waterfall, and water was diverted from the stream to provide water for mine sluicing and processing.

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Discover The North-West
North West Coast
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North West Coast

The North West coast extends from Burnie all the way west to Cape Grim, Tasmania's rugged north-west corner. Along the way are the beachside towns and villages of Wynyard, Boat Harbour Beach, Stanley and Smithton, as well as the rugged volcanic headlands od The Nut (Circular Head), Rocky Cape and Table Cape.

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Central Coast

Central Coast

The first European settlement of Tasmania's Central Coast commenced in the 1840s, the rich basalt soil proved ideal for cropping, and today agriculture is the principal contributor to the area’s economy. Motorists travelling along the north-west of Tasmania are well served by the National Highway. Central Coast, however, is fortunate to have retained a small section of ‘old highway’. This scenic coastal detour hugs the headlands and sandy shores from Ulverstone through to Howth and is well worth the extra time taken to travel this scenic route.

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Central Hinterland

Central Hinterland

Boasting rolling farmland, the hinterland of Tasmania's central coast is home to some of the region's finest agriculture and local produce, its narrow roads making their way through lush farmlands on their way to the alpine terrain of Cradle Mountain. The area is world-renowned for its bush-walking, mountain ranges and canyons, and laid-back small towns set againt mountainous backdrops.

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North-West Hinterland

North West Hinterland

The area is dominated by the Tarkine, a wilderness area containing a wildly diverse landscape, a world of natural treasures including Australia's largest patch of temperate rainforest, mountain ranges, wild river and cave systems and buttongrass moorlands. Waterways can be explored by canoe, kayak and riverboat cruises through forests of blackwood, myrtle and celery top pine all the way to the sea.

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Meander Valley

Meander Valley

Set against the backdrop of the Great Western Tiers, the Mradner Valley is located at the western end of the Central Coasy Hinterland, located midway between Launceston and Devonport. Dotted among the farms of the area are numerous small towns, each with their own individual character and colonial-era charm. Deloraine, on the banks of the Meander River, has become a centre for artists and craftspeople, drawn by the lifestyle and inspired by the stunning scenery.

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West Coast

West Coast

2 to 3 hours drive from Devonport and Burnie, Tasmania's West Coast region is made up of serene natural harbours, rugged coast, densely forested mountain ranges, fast flowing rivers, steep gorges, rainforest wilderness and ghost towns. The region has some of the most pristine and beautiful wilderness in the world, encapsulated in the World Heritage listed Franklin-Gordon Wild Rivers National Park. Bushwalkers are rewarded by spectacular nature sights. Even the less energetic can enjoy the untouched rainforests while cruising the Gordon and Pieman Rivers.

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Gourmet Encounters
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North West Tasmania is one of Australia’s great food bowls. The region’s rich soil and pristine coastline is ideal for root vegetables and livestock, but has also encouraged forward-thinking growers to try their hand at more unusual produce such as saffron, wakame and native pepperberries.

Gourmet Encounters

Locals and visitors alike can source the freshest fine produce direct from the grower, from bags of apples to cherries, apricots, berries, seasonal stonefruit, cheeses and olives to meats, wines, jams, pickles and liqueurs.

As you use this online guide to explore Tasmania's North West, watch out for our Gourmet Encounters banner identifying where you can pick your own fresh berries, head up the driveway offering shed door sales and sample locally grown quality produce, or taste flavours that come direct to your from the artisans who created them.

Drives
Drives
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Bass Highway

Bass Highway connects the major cities and towns of Tasmania's North West - beginning at Launceston, and following the coast through Devonport and Burnie, all the way to Marrawah on the west coast. Along the way, there are dozens of roads leading off the highway that will take you to pretty coastal villages on one side and the region's beautiful hinterland on the other.

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Great Western Tiers

The Great Western Tiers are the northern face of the Tasmanian Central Plateau, which rises up to 1420m above sea level and is dominated by Cradle Mountain. In the foothills of the Great Western Tiers can be found a wide range of attractions both man made and natural which can be explored on this drive. It is also an alternative route to reach Cradle Mountain from Launceston. Allow a full day for the drive; add additional time if you are contemplating taking any of the bushwalks in the area or spending more time than a quick visit.

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Old Surrey Road

Take a drive from Burnie along one of North West Tasmania's most historic roads, pioneered by the region's premier explorer, Henry Hellyer. In 1827, work commenced on the construction of a road from the little settlement of Burnie to Surrey Hills, an inland area selected as a suitable place for the Company’s sheep to graze. The road work employed five men, constructing a muddy track through the dense coastal rain forests. This route generally follows what is now Marine Terrace to the Emu River, then up from the coastal plain via Old Surrey Road, through Romaine, Ridgely, Highclere and on to Hampshire, a distance of around 30 km.

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Castra Road

Castra Road (State Route B15) starts at Ulverstone and winds its way south through picturesque hills and farmland on its way to Nietta, a tiny village located about 44 kilometres south-west of the town of Devonport. If approached from Devonport via Forth, Castra Road is joined at the village of Sprent. On the way you'll pass some of the prettiest dairy farming country you are ever likely to see. Drive a little further past Nietta and you'll reach Leven Canyon, a little-known tourist destination in Tasmania where you'll come face to face with nature at its most dramatic.

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Meander Valley Highway

There are essentially two ways to travel by road between Devonport and Launcestion; there's Bass Highway, which takes around an hour and bypasses just about every town on the way; and then there's the Meander Valley Highway, which follows Bass Highway closely, but takes in just about every town, village and settlement between Deloraine and Launceston. It will take a lot longer, and how much longer depends on how captivating you find the picturesque Georgian villages you pass through.

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Preolenna Valley

There are hundreds of names on a map of Tasmania, which to many Tasmanians are just that – a name on a map. Preolenna is such a place. I must admit that when a friend suggested it as a place to visit, I not only had to look on a map to find out where it was, I also had difficulty finding information about it. To my surprise I found that it was only 44 km west.

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Highland Lakes Road

Highland Lakes Road gets nowhere near the same amount of useage as Tasmania's other North to South main roads, so chances are you won't see much other traffic. This makes it easy to stop and taking in the scenery - and there is plenty to stop and take in - without having to worry about that driver who is hard on your tail and wants to go faster than you do. It's a sealed road all the way, but be aware that snow is common in winter. Highland Lakes Road begins in the north near Deloraine and finished in the south at Bothwell. From there, it is an easy drive through the Derwent Valley to Hobart.

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Forth to Sprent Regional Drive

As you enter Forth from Turners Beach, there is a road off to the right signposted to Kindred, a little village about seven kilometres away. Take this road and you'll find yourself on a delightful drive through lush farmlands and rolling hills. Before too long you will arrive at Kindred which, like many regional villages, could best be described as a string of farms scattered on either side of a few buildings that form the nucleus of the community.

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Cradle Mountain Drive

Australia's most recognisable mountain, Cradle Mountain forms the northern end of the wild Cradle Mtn. - Lake St Clair National Park, itself a part of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area. The familiar jagged contours of Cradle Mountain epitomise the feel of a wild landscape, while abundant wildlife, icy streams, alpine heathlands, colourful deciduous beech and ancient pines reflected in still glacial lakes entice many visitors to stay and explore. There are a number of ways to get there; this drive, beginning at Devonport or Latrobe, is one of the more interesting.

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Walks and Trails
Walks
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North West Tasmania is a walker's paradise. The coastline offers plenty of opportunities to stretch your legs and explore. The hinterland has mountain peaks and canyons; the Bass Strait shoreline was created by ancient volcanic activity, leaving behind a dramatic coastline that begs to be explored and appreciated.



Fern Glade

Burnie
1 hour return

Fern Glade is a magnificent walk among spectacular tree ferns along the Emu River. There's plenty of wildlife, and if you are lucky you may see a platypus.

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Romaine Reserve

Burnie
1 hr return

Suburban Romaine Reserve features a fitness track that winds around a dam on Romaine Creek containing wild fowl. Beyond the lake is a picturesque bushland walk.

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Burnie Park

Burnie
40 mins return

A pleasant walk through the manicured gardens and lawns of Burnie Park, then up a walking trail through a strip of remnant forest to Oldaker Falls.

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Dove Lake

Cradle Mountain National Park
2-3 hour circuit

A great introductory walk to the park. Enjoy iconic views of Cradle Mountain on one of Tasmania's most premier short walks.

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Cradle Summit

Cradle Mountain National Park
8 hours return

A challenging track to the summit of Cradle Mountain. 600 metre climb in elevation. Walk includes crossing wide rocks.

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Crater Lake

Cradle Mountain National Park
2 hour circuit

Explore a series of delightfully different alpine lakes. Some bushwalking experience recommended. Tracks has a rough surface.

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Enchanted Walk

Cradle Mountain National Park
20 minute circuit

A walk to suit all age groups - featuring a cascading river and magic old-growth rainforest.

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Leven Canyon

Nietta
45 minutes

It is rare in the world to find such a powerful place as the Leven Canyon that is so easy to access. Enjoy spectacular sweeping views.

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St Valentine's Peak

Burnie
4 hours return

It a good strenuous walk to the summit of St Valentine's Peak, but well worth the effort. The track is quite steep in places.

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The Nut Walk

Stanley
45 minutes return

The Nut is a 143 metre high massif, rising from Bass Strait that towers over the town of Stanley. Walk to the top or take the chairlift.

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Mount Gnomon

Penguin
1 hr/2 km return

One of several rewarding short walks in the Dial Range, a collection of modest peaks on North-West Coast.

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Meander Falls Circuit

Deloraine
5-6 hours

One of Tasmania's best set of waterfalls, great walks and photo opportunities. One of the great short-medium bushwalks in Tasmania.

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Mt Roland

Sheffield
5-6 hours

Located on the edge of the Great Western Tiers region of Tasmania, the walk is easy to follow, with a large portion done across the plateau along to the summit.

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Liffey Falls

Deloraine
45 minutes return

Liffey Falls is one of Tasmania's prettiest waterfalls, is located in cool temperate rainforest featuring myrtle, sassafras and leatherwood near Mole Creek.

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Philosophers Falls

Waratah
1 hour return

An easy, magical walk through a rainforest with plenty of photo opportunities. There are about 200 stairs to the viewing platform. A hidden jewel of The Tarkine.

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Dip Falls

Mawbanna
30 minutes

Four short walks lead to the base of these picturesque falls, its viewing platform, an old sawmill boiler and the nearby “Big Tree”.

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Archer's Knob

Port Sorell
3.5 hours circuit

See some of the best views in Narawrntapu National Park from the supberb Archer's Knob lookout - birds, beach and paperbark swamp.

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Alum Cliffs

Great Western Tiers
50 minutes return

Enjoy a quiet country stroll to a forest lookout perched high above the Mersey River, as it flows beneath the Alum Cliffs.

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Railton to Sheffield Rail Trail

Sheffield
12 km/ 3 hrs

The Railton to Sheffield Rail Trail is a 12km, grade 3 One Way hike. This trail traverses a variety of countryside, mainly off road, following the old railway corridor.

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Don to Devonport Cycleway

Devonport
7.5 km

See some of the nicest parts of Devonport by walking or cycling the rail trail. Parts of the trail run parallel with the railway to Burnie and the Don River tourist railway.

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Quamby Bluff Summit Track

Deloraine
5 hrs return

A steep walk that is rewarded with 360 degree panoramic views across the Great Western Tiers, as far as Launceston and Devonport on a clear day. Medium difficulty.

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Mt Murchison Summit Track

Rosebery/Tullah
12 km/ 3 hrs

A hard walk with some scrambling over rocks but is worth all the effort! The Mountain has three lakes on it including Hanging Lake which looks almost like an infinity swimming pool.

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Milkshake Hills Summit Walk

Smithton
1 hour return

Branching off the 15 minute return rainforest walk, the summit walk traverses a short section of the rainforest before it begins its ascent towards the summit.

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Postmans Track, Rocky Cape NP

Sisters Beach
30 mins return

Named after the route used for horseback postal deliveries early this century, this track circles the easternmost section of Rocky Cape National Park, near Sisters Beach.

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Parsons Track

Mole Creek
6 hr return

A walk to the sandstone rock visible near the top of the Great Western Tiers, looking south from Mole Creek village. Shorter walks access signposted landmarks along the Track.

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Lobster Falls

Mole Creek
2 hour return

A walk through regrowth forest and a fine grove of Banksias to Lobster Falls lower cascade. The track follows a high route before dropping down steeply to the river bank.

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Devil's Gullet

Mole Creek
30 mins return

A short alpine walk leads to a stunning lookout platform overhanging the huge chasm of the Fisher River valley. Enjoy views to Mount Ossa, Cradle Mountain on a clear day.

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Hellyer Gorge Rainforest Walk

Hellyear Gorge, near Waratah
20 mins return

A delightful wayside stop on the Murchison Highway, the steep, winding gorge of the Hellyer River is filled with rainforest of tall myrtle beech, encrusted with mosses, fungi and epiphyte orchids. A number of walking tracks along the banks of the Hellyer River (near the rest area) provide a pleasant walk to refresh before journeying on.

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Taste and Buy
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Known for its unspoiled natural beauty, rich soil and friendly locals, Tasmania's North West combines stunning scenery with great produce and the ease and comfort of small town living. Roadside stalls and farmhouse shops sell vegetables and fruits, pies, cheeses and handcrafted chocolates, while cellar doors offer wines, beers and whisky from dedicated boutique wineries and distilleries.

Tasting

The Cradle to Coast Tasting Trail is designed to help you discover the best artisanal producers this special region of Tasmania has to offer. Stretching from Launceston to Devonport and on to Stanley in Tasmania's far North West, the trail highlights artisanal producers committed to sustainable practices and making the most of this unique environment to create world-class, award-winning produce.

With more than 20 makers on the trail, you're sure to find something to tantalise your taste buds.

Dowload the Trail Guide



Explore Tasmania
Burnie, Tasmania

About The Region
Regional Centres
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The North West region of Tasmania covers a vast area including the towns of Devonport, Burnie, Cradle Mountain National Park and the Tasmanian west coast as far south as Strahan and Queenstown. The gateway to this region is Devonport, with an airport and the Spirit of Tasmania (ferry between Victoria and Tasmania) terminus. The port handles much of the export produce from the rich agricultural areas around Devonport. The town itself is used as an arrival or departure port for most travellers rather than a destination itself.

A major farming area stretches from Devonport along the coast to Stanley. Many of Australia's finest vegetable and dairy produce come from this region. Stanley is an historic fishing village with a large volcanic headland - The Nut - accessible by chairlift. Far out to the north-west in the stormy waters of Bass Strait, King Island consists very much of uninhabited bushland teeming with wildlife. The island produces some of the best dairy products, for which it is famous.

Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park, in Tasmania's World Heritage Wilderness Area, offers a rugged environment with many wilderness retreats and walking tracks. Icy streams, ancient pines, glacial lakes and wildlife surround the jagged contours of Cradle Mountain. The area is one of the most glaciated in Australia and includes Tasmania's highest mountain, Mt Ossa (1617 metres) and Lake St Clair, Australia's deepest natural freshwater lake, the source of the River Derwent.

The West Coast area of Tasmania is made up of rugged coast, mountain ranges, flowing rivers, steep gorges, rainforest wilderness and ghost towns. Strahan is situated on Macquarie Harbour and is the starting point for Gordon River cruises and air tours over the South West Wilderness. Strahan is the only town on this rugged and dangerous coast.
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